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Mathematics

 


Mathematics is a unique and powerful
way of viewing the world to investigate patterns, order, generality and uncertainty. Mathematics assists individuals to make meaning of their world. The use of mathematics empowers individuals to distil the essence of life experiences into universally true abstractions and, at the same time, to apply these abstract ideas to interpret new situations in the real world.

Courses offered

Middle school mathematics

Mathematics for middle school is based on the Australian Curriculum ensuring strong links are made between the various components of mathematics and its application to other disciplines. The subject is composed of multiple but interrelated and interdependent concepts and systems which students apply beyond the mathematics classroom.
Noosa District State High School ensures that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply their mathematical understanding creatively and efficiently. The mathematics curriculum provides students with carefully paced, in-depth study of critical skills and concepts. Our educational purpose is to encourage students to become self-motivated, confident learners through inquiry by providing opportunities for active participation in challenging and engaging experiences.
 
General Mathematics  - Year 11 (2019)
 
The major domains of mathematics in General Mathematics are Number and algebra, Measurement and geometry, Statistics and Networks and matrices, building on the content of the P–10 Australian Curriculum. Learning reinforces prior knowledge and further develops key mathematical ideas, including rates and percentages, concepts from financial mathematics, linear and non-linear expressions, sequences, the use of matrices and networks to model and solve authentic problems, the use of trigonometry to find solutions to practical problems, and the exploration of real world
phenomena in statistics.
General Mathematics is designed for students who want to extend their mathematical skills beyond Year 10 but whose future studies or employment pathways do not require calculus. It incorporates a practical approach that equips learners for their needs as future citizens. Students will learn to ask appropriate questions, map out pathways, reason about complex solutions, set up models and communicate in different forms. They will experience the relevance of mathematics to their daily lives, communities and cultural backgrounds. They will develop the ability to understand,
analyse and take action regarding social issues in their world. When students gain skill and self-assurance, when they understand the content and when they evaluate their success by using and transferring their knowledge, they develop a mathematical mindset.
It is strongly advised that students have successfully completed CORE Maths in Year 10 before attempting General Mathematics.
 
Mathematical Methods - Year 11 (2019)
Mathematics teaching and learning practices range from practising essential mathematical routines to develop procedural fluency, through to investigating scenarios, modelling the real world, solving problems and explaining reasoning. When students achieve procedural fluency, they carry out procedures flexibly, accurately and efficiently. When factual knowledge and concepts come to mind readily, students are able to make more complex use of knowledge to successfully formulate, represent and solve mathematical problems. Problem-solving helps to develop an ability to transfer mathematical skills and ideas between different contexts. This assists
students to make connections between related concepts and adapt what they already know to new and unfamiliar situations. With appropriate effort and experience, through discussion, collaboration and reflection of ideas, students should develop confidence and experience success in their use of mathematics.
The major domains of mathematics in Mathematical Methods are Algebra, Functions, relations and their graphs, Calculus and Statistics. Topics are developed systematically, with increasing levels of sophistication, complexity and connection, and build on algebra, functions and their graphs, and probability from the P–10 Australian Curriculum. Calculus is essential for developing an understanding of the physical world. The domain Statistics is used to describe and analyse phenomena involving uncertainty and variation. Both are the basis for developing effective models of the world and solving complex and abstract mathematical problems.
The ability to translate written, numerical, algebraic, symbolic and graphical information from one representation to another is a vital part of learning in Mathematical Methods.
 
Students who undertake Mathematical Methods will see the connections between mathematics and other areas of the curriculum and apply their mathematical skills to real-world problems, becoming critical thinkers, innovators and problem-solvers. Through solving problems and developing models, they will appreciate that mathematics and statistics are dynamic tools that are critically important in the 21st century.
It is strongly advised that students have successfully completed Maths Extension in Year 10 before attempting Mathematical Methods.
 
Specialist Mathematics - Year 11 (2019)
 
Mathematics teaching and learning practices range from practising essential mathematical routines to develop procedural fluency, through to investigating scenarios, modelling the real world, solving problems and explaining reasoning. When students achieve procedural fluency, they carry out procedures flexibly, accurately and efficiently. When factual knowledge and concepts come to mind readily, students are able to make more complex use of knowledge to successfully formulate, represent and solve mathematical problems. Problem-solving helps to develop an ability to transfer mathematical skills and ideas between different contexts. This assists
students to make connections between related concepts and adapt what they already know to new and unfamiliar situations. With appropriate effort and experience, through discussion, collaboration and reflection of ideas, students should develop confidence and experience success in their use of mathematics.
The major domains of mathematical knowledge in Specialist Mathematics are Vectors and Matrices, Real and Complex Numbers, Trigonometry, Statistics and Calculus. Topics are developed systematically, with increasing levels of sophistication, complexity and connection, building on functions, calculus, statistics from Mathematical Methods, while vectors, complex numbers and matrices are introduced. Functions and calculus are essential for creating models of the physical world. Statistics are used to describe and analyse phenomena involving probability, uncertainty and variation. Matrices, complex numbers and vectors are essential tools for explaining abstract or complex relationships that occur in scientific and technological endeavours.
Students who undertake Specialist Mathematics will develop confidence in their mathematical knowledge and ability, and gain a positive view of themselves as mathematics learners. They will gain an appreciation of the true nature of mathematics, its beauty and its power. Assumed knowledge, prior learning or experience
 
Specialist Mathematics is designed to be taken in conjunction with, or on completion of, Mathematical Methods. It is assumed that work covered in Mathematical Methods will be known before it is required in Specialist Mathematics.
Assumed knowledge refers to the subject matter that teachers can expect students to know prior to beginning this subject. Emphasis is placed on the mastery of content, ensuring key concepts or procedures are learnt fully so they will not need reteaching.
Students need to have attained a B level in Extension Maths.
 

Authority subjects - Year 12 (2019)

An authority subject is based on syllabuses that have been approved and issued by QSA. The results of these subjects count toward the calculation of OPs which are used by the tertiary sector as selection criteria.

Mathematics A

Mathematics A emphasises the development of positive attitudes towards the student’s involvement in mathematics. This development is encouraged through the use of relevant personal and work-related learning experiences. There is also a focus on the development of mathematical knowledge and understanding through investigative and explorative approaches to learning. These approaches provide opportunities to work collaboratively and cooperatively in teams as well as individually.
By the end of this course, students should develop:
  • an appreciation of the value of mathematics to the lifelong learner
  • sound number sense and an ability to view and interpret the world from a quantitative perspective
  • the ability to recognise when situations in their everyday life can be dealt with through mathematical analysis and procedures, and be able to attempt such analysis or procedures with confidence and success
  • an awareness of the elements of chance which exist in some aspects of life and an ability to make decisions informed by this awareness
  • an ability to manage their financial affairs to empower them to make informed consumer decisions
  • an ability to visualise and represent spatial relationships in two and three dimensions
  • an ability to comprehend mathematical information which is presented in a variety of forms to become informed and critical citizens. 

Mathematics B

Mathematics B aims to provide the opportunity for students to participate more fully in lifelong learning. It is recommended for students wishing to pursue further study and training at tertiary level.
By the end of this course, students should develop:
  • broad mathematical knowledge and skills
  • the ability to recognise when problems are suitable for mathematical analysis and solution, and be able to attempt such analysis and solve problems with confidence
  • an awareness of the uncertain nature of their world and be able to use mathematics to help make informed decisions in life-related situations
  • an understanding of the diverse applications of mathematics
  • an ability to comprehend mathematical information which is presented in a variety of forms
  • an ability to communicate mathematical information in a variety of forms
  • an ability to use mathematical procedures to justify conclusions
  • an ability to benefit from the availability of a wide range of technologies
  • an ability to choose and use mathematical instruments appropriately
  • positive attitudes to the learning and practice of mathematics.

Mathematics C 

Mathematics C is a companion subject to Mathematics B. It aims to extend the competency and confidence of students in mathematics beyond the scope of Mathematics B, to build on and combine many of the concepts introduced in Mathematics B (in particular in the study of vectors, matrices and calculus), and to provide further opportunity for students to participate more fully in lifelong learning. Mathematics C is recommended for students wishing to pursue further study and training at tertiary level.
By the end of this course, students should develop:
  • broad mathematical knowledge and skills
  • the ability to recognise when problems are suitable for mathematical analysis and solution, and be able to attempt such analysis and solve problems with confidence
  • an awareness of the uncertain nature of their world and be able to use mathematics to help make informed decisions in life-related situations
  • an understanding of the diverse applications of mathematics
  • an ability to comprehend mathematical information which is presented in a variety of forms
  • an ability to communicate mathematical information in a variety of forms
  • an ability to use mathematical procedures to justify conclusions
  • an ability to benefit from the availability of a wide range of technologies
  • an ability to choose and use mathematical instruments appropriately
  • positive attitudes to the learning and practice of mathematics. 

Authority-registered subjects - Year 12 (2019)

An authority-registered subject is has been approved by the QSA and includes substantial vocational and practical components. The results of these subjects do not count toward the calculation of an OP.

Prevocational mathematics

This subject is designed to improve student numeracy by applying mathematics to real-life applications. Students develop confidence as they successfully make meaning of mathematics. Students are required to study 5 topics - number, data, location and time, measurement and finance. Each of these topics is embedded in various learning contexts designed to have relevance to students and significance in vocation. The subject provides a supportive, enjoyable and non-competitive environment where students can develop a positive attitude toward the use of mathematics.

Mathematics competitions

Many competitions are held throughout the year and well done to those students who have participated and achieved success in them. The school is represented by many teams who compete in the QAMT, ICAS and the Sunshine Coast Mathematics competitions. 
 
 
Head of Department 

 

Karyn Bartholomai Shae Bucknall ​  Andrew Doyle ​   Cathy Eden

 

Rob Gibbs Murray Gordon Graeme Rogers Andrew Taylor


Michael Tierney Reg Schmarr Bernard Weekes Alan Westlake
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​ ​​​David Whittaker
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Teacher-Aide​ ​
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Last updated 11 March 2019
Last reviewed 11 March 2019