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Music participation provides a unique opportunity for literacy preparation. Whether the children are singing, playing, or listening, teachers direct them to listen and hear in new ways which exercises their aural discrimination. Playing instruments and adding movement to the lessons teaches children about sequential learning which is essential in reading comprehension.Music participation provides a unique opportunity for literacy preparation. Whether the children are singing, playing, or listening, teachers direct them to listen and hear in new ways which exercises their aural discrimination. Playing instruments and adding movement to the lessons teaches children about sequential learning which is essential in reading comprehension.Music participation provides a unique opportunity for literacy preparation. Whether the children are singing, playing, or listening, teachers direct them to listen and hear in new ways which exercises their aural discrimination. Playing instruments and adding movement to the lessons teaches children about sequential learning which is essential in reading comprehension.Music participation provides a unique opportunity for literacy preparation. Whether the children are singing, playing, or listening, teachers direct them to listen and hear in new ways which exercises their aural discrimination. Playing instruments and adding movement to the lessons teaches children about sequential learning which is essential in reading comprehension.
 
Plato once said that music “is a more potent instrument than any other for education”. You will find many teachers of young children who would agree with him. Recent research has found that music uses both sides of the brain, a fact that makes it valuable in all areas of development. Music affects the growth of a child’s brain academically, emotionally, physically and spiritually.
 
Music is academic. For some people, this is the primary reason for providing music lessons to their children. A recent study from the University of California found that music trains the brain for higher forms of thinking. Second graders who were given music lessons scored 27% higher on proportional math and fractions tests than children who received no special instruction. Research indicates that musical training permanently wires a young mind for enhanced performance.
 
Music is physical. Music can be described as a sport. Learning to sing and keep rhythm develops coordination. The air and wind power necessary to blow a flute, trumpet or saxophone promotes a healthy body.
 
Music is emotional. Music is an art form. We are emotional beings and every child requires an artistic outlet. Music may be your child’s vehicle of expression.
 
Music is for life. Most people can’t play soccer, or football at 70 or 80 years of age but they can sing. And they can play piano or some other instrument. Music is a gift you can give your child that will last their entire lives.
 
 
 
Course Outline
 
In Year 7 students learn to read and compose music as well as perform on the keyboard, initially as a soloist, and then as a member of a small ensemble.
 
In Year 8 students extend their repertoire to include instruments other than keyboard as well as reading and performing more complex music.
 
 
 
A Career in Music
 
 
Music graduates work in a vast range of occupations, including in the corporate and business sectors, arts industry, government and private sectors. It has been shown that employers across these sectors appoint music graduates based on their high-level transferable skills, including in critical and analytical thinking, creativity and their ability to think ‘outside the box’. In addition to these possibilities, the following music-specific careers are also pursued by graduates.Many musicians work simultaneously in several music-related fields in order to effectively structure their income stream. For example, it is common for musicians to work as a freelance performer, recording their musical projects, some composition (film or television) as well as some private instrumental teaching. Here is a list of career options which is a guide for people wishing to work in music. These all connect directly with the subjects taught at the School of Music.
 
 
 
Academic
 
 
composition
 
ethnomusicology
 
musicianship
 
musicology
 
performance
 
technology
 
music librarian/archivist
 
research assistant
 
technician
 
 
Composition
 
 
freelance
 
theatre/dance
 
film/video/tv
 
community music
 
composer in residence
 
 
 
Industry
 
 
arts administrator
 
community music officer
 
concert management
 
critic/reviewer
 
film/video/tv
 
radio
 
instrument building/maintenance
 
multimedia production
 
music management/promotion
 
retail industry
 
music notation/typesetting
 
music librarian/archivist
 
producer
 
recording engineer
 
live sound engineer
 
MIDI/computer programming
 
 
Performance
 
 
accompanist
 
conductor
 
freelance
 
orchestral
 
chamber music
 
popular/rock/jazz
 
performer in residence
 
 
 
Teaching
 
 
Government School classroom
 
Private School classroom
 
Government School instrumental
 
Private School instrumental
 
private instrumental
 
private theory
 
Head of Department

 
  Instrumental Music